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What is Box Lacrosse?

 

Box lacrosse, also known as boxla, box, or indoor lacrosse, is an indoor version of lacrosse played mostly in North America. The game originated in Canada in the 1930s, where it is more popular than field lacrosse and is the national summer sport. Box lacrosse is played between two teams of five players and one goalie each, and is traditionally played on an ice hockey rink once the ice has been removed or covered. The playing area is called a box, in contrast to the open playing field of field lacrosse. The object of the game is to use a lacrosse stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball in an effort to score by shooting a solid rubber lacrosse ball into the opponent's goal. The highest level of box lacrosse is the National Lacrosse League.

Why Box Lacrosse?

 

Box lacrosse is extremely important in the development of all lacrosse players. Box is played at a much faster pace in a much smaller area. Stick skills and lacrosse IQ have got to be top notch to keep up. In recent years we have seen the success translate over to NCAA lacrosse. Many schools are heading their way to Canada for recruiting. It only makes sense for us to jump on board and provide our players with the same opportunities! This year our box program is being taken to a new level. We have re-branded our travel box lacrosse teams as the Wisconsin Mammoth and will pride ourselves on offering the best box lacrosse training in the state of Wisconsin.

For more information on box lacrosse please check out the USBOXLA website!


What can Box Lacrosse do for You?

 

Improved stick skills

Increased passing and shooting accuracy

Learn how to stick fake

Learn how to use a backhand effectively 

How to generate space off ball

The "two man game"

How to effectively run a pick play

Generating better scoring opportunities

Patience under pressure


Here is what some of the best players/coaches in the game are saying about box lacrosse.

 

"Being a part of the finesse and physicality of box lacrosse has been a great experience for me. I feel that I have learned and improved as an overall lacrosse player. Learning to adapt in tight space while reading defenders and offensive players has been the biggest improvement in my game.”

Paul Rabil, NLL & MLL All-Star, NCAA All-American

“I knew that if I wanted to be one of the best players in the world, I would have to dedicate myself to both the indoor and the outdoor game. Playing indoor lacrosse has been a great thing for my career.”

-Casey Powell, MLL/NLL All-Star

“I believe that box lacrosse gives young people many more opportunities to excel in our game.  If I had my choice, I would have every player under the age of twelve play box lacrosse exclusively or at least a majority of the time.  The number of touches of the ball and the ability to develop better stick skills in a game of box lacrosse, far surpasses what happens to young people on a 110 x 60 yard field.  Learning how to pass and catch in traffic, understanding how to shoot, and developing a sense of physicality are all positive traits developed by the box game.” 

- Bill Tierney, US Lacrosse Hall of Fame, Denver University Head Coach, Princeton 6xNational Champion, Team USA 1998 

“American field players would really help themselves if they were exposed to a steady stream of box experience. Box lacrosse is an extremely valuable background for a young player, we need to incorporate more of the indoor skills in to the field game. It is almost a requirement to have a top player with indoor experience on your roster right now.” 

Dom Starsia, University of Virginia Head Coach

Mike Ruggiero

Mike Ruggiero

Wisconsin Mammoth Director